• So far, we've shared Foodspotting tips from restaurant professionals. All of their advice has been awesome, but we wanted to bring in a different kind of food-pro perspective for the third round of tips. Mee-Sun Yuk is the Senior Product Manager for iOS at OpenTable. When she isn't working on the incredibly cool iOS 7 OpenTable app, Mee-Sun is cooking, eating and discovering all kinds of amazing dishes. Her passion for both technology & food shines through in her photography and in this set of tips.


    1. Choose your seat wisely

    You can improve the quality of your food photos even before the food comes out. The best food photos benefit from more natural light, so I always request a table by a window if possible. Also, try to make sure you're not sitting in between the light and your table, or you'll end up with some shadowy shots.


    2. Find a new perspective

    Remember that you're not confined to your seat and your beeline view of the dish. Move your hand position with each photo you take to see what makes the food look the most delicious. It takes some practice with aim, but try raising your camera up and over dishes to get a birds' eye view.


    3. Get handsy

    Sometimes your friends may be impatient to start eating, so use it to your advantage. Get an action shot of how people interact with the dish - especially for dishes that you can really play with, like noodles or meat grilled at the table.


    4. Put together the perfect bite

    A great way to get creative (and hungry!) is to grab your fork and dive in. Focusing the camera on a close up bite brings a great contrast with the rest of the photo. It can also help you show more detail about the dish than you would normally.


    Posted by Spot in Spotlight on October 18, 2013
  • We love discovering great dishes and the places where you can enjoy them, which is why we are super excited to share OpenTable for iOS 7 with the Foodspotting community. The OpenTable app now has new search features and a design that allows restaurants to shine, making it easier than ever to find and book places to eat. Be sure to check out restaurant profile pages – many of them feature Foodspotting photos!

    New features include:

    * Streamlined search: Change the date, time, or party size in line and see results immediately
    * Focus on location: Enter an address or city­ to find restaurants nearby
    * New ways to explore: Browse restaurants by top-rated categories or cuisines
    * Easy access to more info: Swipe left and right to see all available times, and pull down on a restaurant page to see Foodspotting photos
    * Points tracking: See your progress toward earning your next Dining Cheque


    New features are also available on OpenTable for iOS 6 and iPad. Have a question or feedback to share? Please email iOShelp@opentable.com.

    Download OpenTable for iOS 7

  • Many of you share more than photos of food on Foodspotting, which is why our second set of spotting tips & tricks are from our friend Daniel Kent, bartender/cocktail savant at Locanda Vini e Olii in Brooklyn, NY. Daniel's advice touches on color, presentation and why it's always important to highlight the "bouquet" of a cocktail.


    The art of the cocktail changes the act of drinking. It’s not as simple as opening a bottle of wine or beer and pouring it into a glass. Its color, presentation and bouquet are all aspects of the cocktail that are manufactured to give a unique beverage experience. A sophisticated cocktail will deliver all three of these elements in unison. Capturing these parts of the experience are essential in publishing a perfect cocktail photograph.


    Color

    A bolder, fuller cocktail with a lot of body, should always capture a deeper color scheme. Think of a Manhattan - there’s nothing about a Manhattan that shouts fresh; it has a brooding, burgundy hue that mirrors the wood of the whiskey, the rich aromatics of the vermouth and the tint of bitters. Likewise for fresh cocktails, the color should match the palette. On our menu the Sage Jermaine, the Gin Pompelmino and the Apricot Spritz are exemplary of this concept. Photographed is the Sage Jermaine made with grapefruit infused Spring44 gin, house sage bitters and house elderflower liqueur


    Presentation

    Taking a picture of a finished drink in its glass has its appeal, however, each cocktail has a certain method, measured ingredients, and tedious steps that define its character and give it life. All the parts of the cocktail experience- chilling the glasses, stirring, shaking, muddling, and the pour- are different for each drink and make it enticing for the viewer to watch the process. Photographed is the Apricot Spritz made with Prosecco, Campari and apricot nectar


    Bouquet

    The bouquet of a cocktail is one of the most effective ways to convey taste. The mist of a lemon or an orange as finishing touch on a drink can trigger the most powerful memory association. If you’re photographing a glass of wine, you can really only describe the bouquet. Using a similar way of describing your cocktail bouquet, pay particular attention to any garnishes used in the drink, which are a quick and easy to spot in a photograph. Photographed is the Manhattan made with Old Overholt Rye, Amaro Segesta, muddled orange, brown sugar and Peychaud’s bitters

    After all of this, let us not forget what drinking is all about: being social. Take shots with your friends, partake in obscure and fancy cocktails and enjoy yourself. Be the person your cocktail would want you to be.

  • We always love a good tip or trick when it comes to spotting food. Getting the right angle, working with dim lighting or knowing which part of the dish to focus on isn’t always as easy as pie. So, we decided to reach out to our friends in the food & drink industry for their insider-advice.

    First up is Luke McKinley, Independent Photographer & Videographer and Director of Drink at Ravish in Seattle, WA. He shared with us these tips & tricks, along with some beautiful spots he took at Ravish.


    1. Use light creatively:
    Good food photos use light to make a dish, drink, or table look welcoming and delicious. Use available light to your advantage; frequently, light from a nearby window is enough to perfectly illuminate a dish. Light that hits your subject from the side, ideally at a 45-degree angle, brings out textures and casts attractive shadows on your subject. Lighting your subject from behind (i.e. with the window behind the plate) can create dramatic silhouettes of food and drinks and illuminates steam. Use a flash on your camera if you want to see detail in your subject, but make sure it's appropriate to use flash in the restaurant before you do. Not daytime? Candles cast cool shadows, or use a restaurant's lamps to your advantage.


    2. Composition:
    Think clearly about what you want your food photo to convey. Do you want to show a picture of delicious food. Get close and let the dish occupy the entire frame. Do you want to showcase a more expansive view of your dining experience? Consider an overhead view shot of the table, or include the restaurant in the background.


    3. Creative content:
    Once you've decided on what you're going to include in the frame, think creatively about how to capture it. Attention-grabbing photos of food are effective because they either 1) convey vivid, mouth-watering detail; or 2) show food and drink in new, creative ways. Dining is an experience, so let your food composition express it fully and authentically. Capture your friend scooping a heaping forkful of that leek and mushroom quiche. Let your food photos tell a story so that their viewers are hungry for more.


    Curious about tricks that make soup look exciting? Want tips for spotting salad? Let us know what tips & tricks you're interested in with a comment below!

  • Just when we think we’ve heard it all, another astounding, delectable dish pops up and teaches us that there is more food in this world than one person can know. To celebrate that fact, and to push ourselves to learn more and try everything, we’re starting a new feature—Dish of the Day.

    How will we go about finding all the worthy dishes? With your help, of course! All you need to nominate the next Dish of the Day feature is just the proper hashtag, #Dishoftheday, and a Foodspotting URL! That’s it.

    How to nominate the next Dish of the Day

    TWITTER: Tweet a Foodspotting link and #DishoftheDay with your nomination.

    FACEBOOK: Post a link of the dish on our Facebook wall.

    TUMBLR: Tumble your Dish of the Day nomination on Tumblr and use #DishoftheDay.

    INSTAGRAM: Next time you Instagram a particularly worthy #food image, nominate it as #DishoftheDay.

    PINTEREST: When you’re pinning food to boards on Pinterest, add a #DishoftheDay to the description to nominate something noteworthy.

    GOOGLE+: Share the Foodspotting link on Google+ and tag it as #DishoftheDay.

    Not one for social networks? Then just let us know anytime in this handy Google Form.

    What to nominate

    Here's what we we're looking for:
    - the unsung heros of Foodspotting
    - beautiful photographs
    - interesting or unique dishes
    - dishes from new, notable, rising restaurants and chefs
    - colorful dishes with a history or fascinating story

    We’ll feature a Dish of the Day twice a week, so keep your eyes peeled and send the good stuff our way. Com’mon, let’s celebrate food discovery with a Dish of the Day—spectacular new dishes for you to crave.

    Photos (top left then clockwise): Belgian Waffle from BICCCS by Oliver Jansson, Monkfish, Pork Fat, Spiced Pear from Vue de Monde by omggimmenow, Sweet Surrender from Cold Layers by C&C&C, and Laksa from 928 Yishun Laksa by WL Goh

    Posted by April in Spotlight on October 10, 2012
  • You don't have to ask us twice to go check out good food, good wine, and top San Francisco chefs and restaurants - twist our arm, why don't you. We had the great pleasure of attending the SF Chefs Grand Tasting Tent earlier in the month, which boasts a superb lineup of the SF Bay Area food scene. The festivities surrounding SF Chefs start every year at the end of July and are designed to showcase the city's food and wine talent.

    Our only problem was we made the rookie move of eating breakfast. Have no fear - we did not let a slightly full stomach stop us from enjoying delicious samplings from the likes of Credo, La Mar, Murray Circle, Viognier and much more. The event was bustling and there was a solid vibe of excitement buzzing through the canopy. All the vendors clearly had as much fun as the attendees did. We even caught glimpses of Celebrity Chefs Martin Yan and Marcus Samuelsson.

    We highly recommend checking out SF Chefs next year if you get the chance. And for your continued SF Chefs fix, follow SF Chefs on Foodspotting to get a taste of the great food involving participating restaurants outside of the event.

  • You may already know that we think food and travel go pretty well together, which is why we're thrilled Contiki Vacations has joined Foodspotting to share their recommendations around the globe.

    Contiki hosts tours for young travelers around the world, and offers experiences filled with sightseeing and culture in over 40 countries. We're definitely keeping an eye on more dishes recommended by this well-traveled bunch.

    Follow Contiki's guides here, which will continue to expand.

    • almost 2 years ago.
      We're excited to be a part of Foodspotting!
    • over 1 year ago.
      hai Fiona,a zillion thanks for sending me the foodspotting sticker and is really great to have one piece of foodspotting stickers even its is small one, and thanks again,by the way i am trying to promoted this foodsporting at malaysia and of course is going to be my place where my mr bee bistro is....and i need your help to show me how its goes about.my address :Mr bee cafe and bistro,lot 680,pantai tengah, langkawi island,(7000)kedah darul aman . Malaysia.by the have a good day and enjoy your food.
  • The sun setting over the crowd at GoogaMooga.

    Last weekend, the stars aligned at the first ever Great GoogaMooga food and music festival in Brooklyn's beautiful Prospect Park. Though the lines were long, they only attested to the fact that good food, chefs, restaurants and bands, like The Roots and Hall & Oates, plus the chance to spend a beautiful Spring day with friends will always draw an enthusiastic crowd.

    Hard at work.

    To get you guys in the Foodspotting spirit, we teamed up with the Great GoogaMooga on two fun contests. Huge thanks to everyone who came out to say hi, spot food and spend two gloriously sunny afternoons with us!

    NYC Foodspotting ambassador Meng goes for it.

    There was a pig roasting inside this heavy metal pig.

    Our Orlando Foodspotting ambassador Julius was in town!

    Hall & Oates on Sunday at GoogaMooga.

    PHOTOS BY NYC Foodspotting Ambassador Meng He.
    CHECK OUT more dishes from the event on Foodspotting.
    LIKE US on Facebook for more photos from the event!

    Posted by Amy Cao in Spotlight on May 24, 2012
    • almost 2 years ago.
      Such a great time, I'm STILL sorting through photos. Such a great time hanging out with the Foodspotting team at this awesome event! Meng - great job on photos! No model, just a guy eating lol. Fun snapping photos with you! Thanks Foodspotting!
    • almost 2 years ago.
      Looks like you had a blast! Great pics. Brigitte Grisanti
    • almost 2 years ago.
      wow in what place is this event
    • over 1 year ago.
      very wonderful vacation. I wish to join in it...http://www.mattressland.co.uk/